News from the Farm…

Hi Friends,

Got more produce than you can eat these days? Just can’t stop picking in the pick-your-own? This is a great time of year to start stocking up for winter!

New to preserving the harvest? Here are some great recipes to help you:
~Air dry your herbs;
~Freeze herbs in oil;
~Freeze carmelized onions;
~Can cucumbers;
~Make sauerkraut;
~Make & freeze kale and basil pesto;
~Preserve hot peppers

Or, if you’ve been canning, freezing or drying for years, please email us links to any favorite recipes or tips. Or better yet, make a video and send us a link! We’d love to share with members in newsletters to come.

Support your local farmer!

Pick-up your veggies on your pick-up day! Can’t make it? Please send a friend to pick up for you – no need to contact us, just do it! Emails requesting a rearrangement of your pick-up schedule really slow down our beloved farmer Ray, who is quite magical but still cannot simultaneously answer emails and till the fields.


In the share this week:

lettuce
braising greens (kale and chard)
melon
tomatoes!mix and match options:

summer squash, zucchini, beets, cucumbers, carrots, fennel, onions, sweet peppers, hot peppers, eggplant

above and below: We plant sweet potato “slips” in the spring, and then harvest and cure ’em in the fall. This year’s plants are looking great!

Pick Your Own:

shishito peppers
flowers
green beans
herbs: oregano, parsley, cilantro, basil, dill, thyme, sage, mint
During this pandemic season, please: bring your own scissors, containers & water; no sampling; wash your hands & wear masks; and keep your kiddos close!
above: pepper field under a post-storm sky with sunset

Ideas & Recipes

11 Chefs on their Favorite Ways to Cook Fennel

Sauteéd Swiss Chard with Orange

Hummus Heaped with Tomatoes & Cucumbers

Grilled Steak Salad with Beets & Scallions


Food for Thought…

The Outstretched Earth by Jane Mead

Do you know what whole fields are?
They are fields with a dog and a moon.
Do you know the answer — for the many?

Except there would be vineyards.
Meaning there would, as usual, be commerce.
Money, and a game of sorts to play it.

Meanwhile — Emma lost in the cover-crop.
Top of her head bobbing through mustard-flower.
It is, after all, still here —

The real world, the outstretched earth,
Rain, soil, copper for pennies.

above: Rye is a beloved cover crop at Next Barn Over Farm…